DANIELE MACUGLIA
Contact me

DANIELE MACUGLIA

Contact me
immagine copertina mobile Teaching Philosophy

At the University of Chicago, I learned a solid professional code of ethics, which I have applied both in my teaching and in my research. In the classroom I constantly strive to create a fair, uncompromising, and all-inclusive learning environment, offering my students an opportunity to succeed no matter their ethnicity, gender, religious beliefs, sexual orientations, or possible disabilities. I recognize and unconditionally respect these differences, I pledge to act impartially, and I strive to always be an empathetic teacher.

I approach the classroom by making use of my backgrounds in history, physics, and Italian culture, as well as my knowledge of both the European and US academic systems. Teaching, for me, primarily represents an opportunity to be a cultural ambassador and to enhance cross-cultural and interdisciplinary experiences for my students.

All my classes, including reading and discussion groups, are research oriented, engaging with history in various manuscripts, artifacts, and museum collections. I involve my students in a wide range of tasks and activities, providing an abundance of primary sources to analyze, promoting independent archival research, encouraging collaborations with various departments, supervising the reading of sources written in English and Italian, offering weekly quizzes to test student comprehension, and encouraging in-class presentations, as well as promoting fruitful connections with special collections and other on-campus resources (especially museum resources).

While at the undergraduate level my primary goal is to provide students with solid historical methods to take the first steps into research, at the graduate level I assist students with the production of articles suitable for publications in SSCI and AHCI journals. Here you can find two examples of my teaching evaluations: “The Civilization of the Italian Renaissance: Science, Culture & Society” and “Galileo Galileo”. Both courses were taught at the University of Chicago.